For most people, changing jobs and joining the staff of a new organisation can be a time of trepidation as well as excitement – but what is it like when your arrival and induction happen to coincide with a global pandemic?  Claire Fisher, who joined us as Head of Finance in early June, shares the background that led to her joining our charity and reflects on her first six weeks in post during such an unprecedented time.

Claire said: “Being born and bred in Plymouth, the name of St Luke’s was very familiar to me and I’ve always known it to be synonymous with dignity, respect and compassion. So, when I heard about the opportunity to join as Head of Finance, it really sparked my interest and I wanted to find out more.

“My whole career has revolved around finance, which is not that surprising given that maths was my favourite subject at school, and it was joining Plymouth City Council at the age of 18 that gave me the chance to train and qualify as an accountant. Then, when Plymouth became a unitary authority, in 1998, I was promoted to the role of Group Accountant, leading a team providing technical accountancy support to the whole authority, on topics such as VAT and treasury management. I also took a lead role in the production and audit of the statutory accounts and submission of government returns.

“The council played a really important part in my life, and not simply because it’s where I spent the first 24 years of my career. It’s was also where I met my husband, but later – after we had our children – my perspective began to change and I found myself seeking a new professional direction where I could hopefully see more of a tangible positive impact for my efforts.  Teaching was a career I’d considered at school and, though I decided again not to take that path, the idea of broadening my horizons and working in a school remained attractive.

“It was the opportunity to join Lipson Co-operative Academy as Assistant Business Manager, in 2013, that saw me take the leap into a very different work environment. I had the autonomy to review and shape all aspects of the school’s financial activities, and I’m proud of the improvements I made during my seven years there.  I also managed other aspects of the school business activities, including main reception, which helped me to get involved in all aspects of school life.”

“I wasn’t actively seeking change of job when the advert for the Head of Finance role at St Luke’s was pointed out to me by a friend.  However, the chance to develop professionally – while also making a valuable contribution to one of the charities I personally support – made it an opportunity not to be missed!  For me, part of the attraction of working for a charity is that rather than the focus being on expenditure, as in my previous roles, the key is to develop and sustain income streams.  Of course, the delivery of quality services to local people is at the heart of what we do here, and that has been an important aspect for me throughout my career.

“What no-one could have foreseen, of course, was the pandemic and the huge impact it would have on everyone’s lives, including at work. I won’t pretend that my induction period has been without its challenges, given the very unusual circumstances, but the warmth of the welcome I’ve received from everyone has been truly humbling and helped me to quickly feel part of the team. In particular, my Finance team colleagues have gone out of their way to help me settle in.

“I’ve really appreciated the friendliness and support, especially as I joined just a week before the main annual audit, an exceptionally busy time made all the more demanding by the additional workload brought about because of the COVID-19 situation, including the financial modelling that’s been urgently required to help our charity steer its way through these unchartered waters and keep providing such outstanding end of life care.

“This role and the organisation itself both feel a really good fit for me. My great auntie and my husband’s auntie were both cared for at Turnchapel, where I’m based (though currently doing some of my work from home), so I already knew it was an uplifting place, and I feel a real affinity with all that St Luke’s stands for.

“I only have to look as far as the messages that come in with some of the donations to sense the overwhelming love and respect our community has for St Luke’s and the fact there are so many ‘stories’ lying behind the £ signs I see in our accounts. For example, there was one just recently from a regular volunteer, who said she was making a donation in lieu of putting in her usual shifts – she wanted to continue contributing to the cause she holds so dear while she awaits the call to return to her voluntary role when it’s safe to do so.

“That sums it up for me. St Luke’s is the city’s best-loved and most respected charity, and I feel excited and proud to now be playing my part in helping to ensure a sustainable future for the vital service it provides.”

Written by Dr Jeff Stephenson, Consultant at St Luke’s Hospice Plymouth

I didn’t pay much attention to the news stories about Wuhan, and the Facebook posts from fellow Christians there asking for prayer. I probably said a few ‘arrow prayers’ but didn’t really engage. It was all far away, and it wouldn’t ever impact us. I’m challenged once again to widen my circle of concern and engagement.

COVID-19 is now here. Changes we have been talking about around our ways of working get a kick-start as staff move out of buildings and embrace technology. Skype and PPE intrude on working days. I dislike both of them. The very thing that brought me into hospice is the human contact. Presence and proximity and touch are fundamental to palliative care. It’s not the same caring for the dying from behind the barriers of mask and gloves.

I read of the experience of Italian colleagues who found that palliative care had to be “brutally” adapted. Early on in our own experience it is restrictions on visiting that injure most, both families and staff. Seemingly inhumane and rapidly changing guidance, in the name of safety. And common sense in applying the guidance for a while goes out of the window, a testimony to the prevalent fear. Thankfully, pragmatism and compassion soon prevail for those at the end of life.

I sense the fear all around. I sense it amongst some of our staff. Society’s new mantra is ‘Stay safe’. Precautions are necessary, but what are such messages doing to the collective psyche in a culture that already idolises safety? I reflect on the early Christians who stayed behind in Carthage and other cities across the Roman Empire to care for plague victims, and the fruit of their service and sacrifice.

Stories from London start to mirror those from Italy, and we begin to take seriously the possible impact on our region. There is talk of a local Nightingale unit. This is a defining hour. Inwardly I sense that it isn’t going to be as bad as they are predicting here. We are not London. I tell colleagues that, based on prophetic conviction rather than science. But I prepare for the worst and trust for the best. And we need to support the wider healthcare community in this crisis or else the credibility of hospices may be in doubt.

We adapt our community and hospital support, and we temporarily increase the number of our beds (all with precious piped oxygen) from twelve to eighteen. We offer to help out with the Nightingale. The option of us taking COVID patients comes to the table.

I meditate for several days on worship and sacrifice. I am genuinely not afraid for myself. I dwell in Psalm 91, reciting it aloud every morning when I arrive on the ward, declaring its truths over the hospice, staff and city. But I am burdened by the possibility of losing one of my nursing or medical colleagues. It seems a reasonable sacrifice to lay down one’s life while trying to save others. But almost all our patients are already dying. Laying down one’s life to enable them to have a better experience? If I died as a direct result of my work, wouldn’t that be a terrible waste? A life poured out in service and worship is never a waste. Greater love has no man than this…..

I recommend that we isolate part of the hospice to take patients dying with or from COVID. It is the right thing to do but it will put staff in harm’s way. I tell my team that I will personally attend any COVID patients admitted to the unit, even if it means coming in when I am not meant to be at work. Their response is humbling and inspiring. They won’t hear of it. In fact, they will preferentially protect me, as my age puts me at higher risk.

The kindness of strangers is all around us in this crisis. It makes me believe that great blessing will come out of it. That and of course the certain knowledge that God works all things for good to those who love him (Romans 8:28).

As the weeks go by it feels like a bit of a ‘phoney war’. There have been cases in the city, and some deaths and the heart-breaking stories surrounding those. But the expected surge hasn’t happened here.

A month on there has been no need for our eight designated COVID beds, so we open them up again to general palliative care. All our services have been strangely quiet. Where are all the ‘usual’ patients? We have had hundreds of empty hospital beds, everything gearing up for a deluge that thankfully never comes.

Three months on and we still haven’t had a patient in the hospice with confirmed COVID.

Now the talk is about the ‘even bigger’ second wave that is going to hit us over the winter. Here we go again. I refuse to buy into that kind of fear. But the toll on staff is showing. Call it ‘COVID fatigue’ if you like, but fatigue seems too bland a description. There is a pervading weariness, bordering on exhaustion in some.

The ‘usual’ patients are coming back, but are generally more poorly than before, often more advanced. The turnover for all teams is ‘brisk’. The emotional impact of the drip feed exposure to suffering is intensified by the post-adrenaline crash, and defences on the line between self-preservation and the need to embrace it in order to engage meaningfully can seem all the more fragile.

But there is hope. And learning. And blessing. Some incredible blessing – He floods the darkness with brightness, even the darkness of the shadow of death (Job 12:22). We talk about and plan for restoration. I am immensely proud of those I work with. Our services will never be the same again – and that for the better. We have shown ourselves to be agile and flexible and resilient. There have been tensions along the way, but we have a greater cohesiveness across clinical teams. We have collaborated effectively with external services. We stepped up to the plate and responded to the need and we will reap the benefits of that. And we have been given the opportunity and privilege of redefining who we are and what we do going forward.

by Dr Jeff Stephenson, Consultant at St Luke’s Hospice Plymouth
*end*

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His gentle humour, a shared visit to Stonehenge and The Beatles’ music are just three of the things that Suzy Bennett thinks about, remembering her much-loved dad Jim Tozer, who sadly died last October, aged 68.

With today being the Plymouth comedian’s first Father’s Day without this special man, who received our care at home before he passed away, she will be spending it with her mum Jeanette, having a ‘duvet day’ as they reminisce, looking through photos from family holidays with Jim and watching films he used to enjoy with them.

While being on lockdown because of the pandemic means they can’t be joined at home by Suzy’s brother Simon and his children Amy, Thomas, Robert and James, all of whom dearly loved spending time with their grandad, they’ll have a ‘drive-by’ visit from them or link up via video-call instead.

Perhaps, too, there’ll be a visit from ‘Pauly’, the friendly blackbird who often appeared in the garden of the family home when Jim was in in his last months of life and who continues to be a regular there.

Suzy said: “It was typical of Dad’s humour that he named him Pauly after Paul McCartney because he was a huge Beatles fan and was thinking of their song ‘Blackbird’. That still makes me smile.

“Music was so much part of Dad’s life. He used to spend hours upstairs writing, recording or just listening to his favourite artists. That’s why we’ve left his room with his guitar and PlayStation just as it was. And the house is full of items emblazoned with the words ‘All You Need is Love’ – the classic Beatles’ song that was special to him.”

Thinking of Father’s Days past, Suzy remembers happy times when the family visited Plymouth Hoe and tucked into fish and chips or ice-cream.

She said: “It was all quite low-key because Dad didn’t like a fuss, and that was very much in keeping with the modest man he was. I miss him so much, and even now catch myself thinking that he’ll still pop his head around the door at any moment.

“Mum and I still talk about Dad all the time, and Father’s Day will be no different. The lyrics to ’All You Need is Love’ seem all the more poignant now. It’s hard being without him and sometimes I struggle but my love for him continues and the memories I have of him go forward with me.”

Learn more how St Luke’s can support you through bereavement.

“It’s almost an over-used phrase these days, but I want my children to know it really is okay not to be okay. If they feel happy and want to have fun, that’s great, but if they feel sad or anxious they don’t have to pretend otherwise.”

While she knows this Father’s Day will be poignant for her and her two children because sadly, her beloved husband Matt is no longer here to share the family occasion, Sarah Geoffrey will be making sure – as she always does – that Eloise, 12, and Dylan, 5, know it’s fine for them to express whatever emotions they are feeling inside.

Our community team cared for Matt at home before he died of cancer in 2018, and the family was supported throughout that time – as well as beyond – by our dedicated Family and Children’s Support Worker, Lisa.

Sarah said: “Being as sensitive we could, Matt and I always tried to be as open as possible with our children about his illness, but after he died it took me a while to realise that there’s no point pretending with them when I’m not feeling okay.

“With the help of St Luke’s and good friends, I’ve learned there’s no right or wrong way to grieve. There are no rules, and when I’m having a tough day, being honest with Eloise and Dylan – in age-appropriate way – is important because it teaches them that they can be real, too.

“Them missing their daddy and feeling angry and sad that he’s not here anymore is completely natural, so at the times they’re feeling that way, it’s healthy for them to express those emotions rather than suppressing them.”

Sarah’s approach then, is to play Father’s Day by ear, respecting that being different ages and personalities Eloise and Dylan often like to go about things differently.

She said: “Eloise tends to keep things low-key and doesn’t want others to feel they need to make a fuss of her because she’s lost her dad. She always lets her friends know it’s okay for them to talk about their own dads though, and her thoughtfulness towards them makes feel proud. Dylan still enjoys making a special Father’s Day card, which he now gives to his grandad – my dad – who we’ll spend time with on the day, having fun in the garden.

“While Matt won’t be with us in person, we’ll be thinking of him, his wicked sense of humour and all the happy times we shared. We’ll go through the memory boxes the children made and look at all our photos, taking our time and remembering how very special he was.”

Find out how St Luke’s can support your child through bereavement with Patches.

In the past few months, death has become a greater part of public life, with so many families sadly losing loved ones and with the media focus firmly on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. But are we getting better at talking more openly about the ‘taboo’ subject of death or do we still hold back because although we’re comfortable with it, we fear others aren’t?

We’re firmly behind the national annual Dying Matters Awareness Week campaign (11 – 17 May) to encourage more honest talk about death, dying and grief, recognising that this helps those affected feel listened to and understood.

To mark this year’s campaign – Dying to be Heard – national charity Hospice UK has revealed new findings from Savanta ComRes that show that 72% of those bereaved in the last five years would rather friends and colleagues said the wrong thing than nothing at all, and 62% say that being happy to listen was one of the top three most useful things someone did after they were bereaved.

Meanwhile, a recent local survey carried out on behalf of St Luke’s, found that just 24% of those polled said they felt ‘very comfortable’ talking about death.

With many people facing the unexpected death of loved ones due to COVID-19, Hospice UK is calling for people to take courage and speak to people about death and bereavement to support those in our society who are dying or grieving.

Tracey Bleakley, CEO of Hospice UK, said “What these findings show is just how important it is for us all to talk about death and grief, particularly when as a nation we are facing higher numbers of unexpected deaths as a result of COVID-19. These issues sadly have a taboo about them, which is unhealthy and can leave people suffering in silence. We owe it to each other to take part in these conversations. So many people are dying to be heard, and we all need to listen.”

In an additional new poll from Opinium on the public’s reaction to COVID-19, while 71% of people agree with the lockdown restrictions, nearly half (48%) said that not being able to see someone before they died or attend a funeral would make it harder to accept the reality of the death. This poll also found that 62% said that not being able to see a dying person before they died would cause a lasting sadness, and one in six (59%) said that they would want a celebration of the person’s life after the lockdown is lifted.

In addition, the survey found that more than 11 million people – 1 in 5 UK adults – have put in place advanced care plans (ACPs) in case they fall ill because of COVID-19, or plan to do so.

As part of our service, we encourage people to create an ACP, a personal statement of wishes that can ensure – as far as is practically possible – that their wishes are respected and acted upon should they be too ill to speak up for themselves in their last days. Having an ACP can bring increased peace of mind not just for the person concerned but for the loved ones around them, too, making a very stressful time that little bit easier.

We also provide emotional, practical and spiritual support for those whose loved one had links to our service before they died.

Jutta Widlake, Head of Social Care at St Luke’s, said: “As a society, we don’t discuss death openly, and because people are living longer most of us don’t experience the loss of someone close to us until we’re well into midlife. Death is a normal part of life though, and we shouldn’t feel held back from talking about it because we fear others might feel uncomfortable if we do.

“As the national survey results show, silence isn’t always golden because most bereaved people welcome friends’ and colleagues’ efforts to help, even if those people are afraid of saying the wrong thing. So, taking that step to express your support – and being there to listen – are among the most important things you can do.”

You can pledge to take part in a conversation about dying, death or grief, either initiating it or taking part if someone else starts it. An online pledge wall and other ways for people to share their pledges can be found here.

For more information www.dyingmatters.org or www.stlukes-hospice.org.uk/acp

1,341 cyclists taking on mud, sweat and gears to clock up a combined 34,602 miles; 84 dedicated volunteers braving the elements – this is what it takes to raise vital funds to keep the wheels of local hospice care turning.

What does it take to make a young terminally ill patient ‘feel like a princess’ in the last days of her life?

Chloe from Callington, Cornwall was just 22 when she came to our specialist unit at Turnchapel to be cared for by our team in December 2017. We pulled out all the stops to create a home from home for her and her loved ones. We helped them make precious memories together, too.

Sadly, Chloe died a few days later, in January 2018.

Here, Chloe’s mum Claire shares her experience of the devastating loss no mother should ever have to face and pays tribute to kind, caring, fun-loving Chloe. Hear how the precious moments they shared when time was running short – and the lasting legacy Chloe has left – bring comfort to Claire in the midst of heartbreak.

Our end of life care is here for young people as well as the elderly. You can help our charity to keep making a vital difference for them and their families 365 days a year, including this festive season – please donate today.

Thank you.

 

Tina Favis of Salcombe was so loved that in every year since she sadly died in 2007, aged just 40, her family and friends have got on their bikes to fundraise for St Luke’s in celebration of her life.

The epic annual Ride for Tina is their way of thanking our team for the sensitive way they cared for this special lady and supported them throughout such a difficult time.

But that’s not all! It speaks volumes about Tina that even many people who never met her join in and go the distance too, including from Land’s End to John O’Groats! Together with Tina’s loved ones, they’ve raised a staggering total of over £115,000 for our vital service! We couldn’t be more grateful.

 

A homegrown hero of the storytelling world, who has ignited the imagination of millions worldwide with his bestselling children’s books featuring fiction’s favourite elephant, is returning to Plymouth for a very special event!

Plymouth born David McKee, celebrated author and illustrator of the much-loved Elmer storybooks – which have sold a staggering 10m copies around the globe – is in the city for the 30th anniversary of his first Andersen Press Elmer publication and he’s set to launch Elmer’s Big Parade, Devon and Cornwall’s biggest art event of 2019, on Monday 8 July.

The Parade, an enchanting trail of 40 unique elephant sculptures lovingly painted by established and emerging artists, including internationally renowned Brian Pollard, will spread a smile across Plymouth and surroundings for ten weeks until 16 September.

The free, family-friendly event – a collaboration between St Luke’s Hospice Plymouth, Wild in Art and Andersen Press – is expected to attract 250 thousand visitors to Plymouth and surroundings, as well as encouraging local people to get outside to discover each member of the mammoth mob, taking them to places they may not have been to before. Along the way, it is expected to bring a huge boost to the local economy, benefiting businesses from shops to restaurants.

These are no ordinary elephants – they’re on an important mission to raise awareness and funds for St Luke’s and the vital service the charity provides, looking after terminally ill patients and supporting their families when time is running short.

Each of the sculptures is sponsored by a local organisation, including businesses of all sizes, with headline sponsor for the event being Stagecoach South West, the region’s leading bus operator.

The much-anticipated Parade is the culmination of months of preparation as the 40 artists selected to paint an ‘Elmer’ worked their magic, some of them based at Herd HQ within St Luke’s pop-up shop selling quality second-hand furniture at the former Toys R Us store at Western Approach, where they have welcomed visitors keen to get a sneaky peek before the big reveal of the finished masterpieces.

A key part the Parade is the educational programme that has engaged 10,000 students across 25 local schools, generously funded by the Thomas Cook Children’s Charity.

Not only has the St Luke’s Education team encouraged the schools to have tonnes of fun learning more about art and creating their own unique mini Elmer, all of which will be on display at Mount Edgecumbe, they’ve come alongside school staff to enhance their confidence and skills in supporting children living with loss.

It’s estimated that 1 in 29 children – one is every class – has experienced the death of someone close to them, so St Luke’s is working with teachers and other staff to encourage more open conversations with youngsters about death, dying and bereavement, which – when conducted sensitively in an age-appropriate way – help ensure no child feels left behind.

Elmer’s Big Parade Plymouth officially launched early this week at a special preview evening, where all 65 Elmer’s were gathered together under one roof for a big reveal to sponsors and artists. Alongside local artists including Brian Pollard was a very special guest – David McKee.

Elmer creator David McKee, grew up in Tavistock and was educated in Plymouth he said: “The pleasure that you can feel that the illustrators and painters have had working with this, there’s a real excitement to be had with this project, which is incredible.

“I’m 84 now, so I’ve seen the way hospices help families. The hospice isn’t just a building that people go to – while it is a big part of it, an even bigger part is all the work which is done in the actual homes of the people who are suffering. A lot of people would prefer to stay in their own home, and St Luke’s helps them to do that.

“To find out there’s such a high percentage of children who know bereavement through the loss of someone close, and that St Luke’s is very involved in helping the children get through those periods, it’s incredible.

“It’s quite emotional really, knowing that something you started that long ago is not only still around, but new things from others have been made because of that. I suppose in a way, there is a sort of responsibility which you feel. Especially when you realise that it’s not just decorative – the cause is such a good one. Helping St Luke’s in any way is a good cause.”

On meeting David, local artist and St Luke’s patron Brian Pollard said, “It was such an honour to meet and talk to the famous creator of Elmer, David McKee. David was delighted to see his creation come to life with the wonderful creativity of mainly local artists. I was surprised to hear that he had also visited a local gallery to view my paintings and he went on to make some positive remarks about my artwork.

“I think I can speak for all the artists when I say we are all honoured and delighted to be involved in such a wonderful fundraising project, for a charity that is so close to all our hearts.” Brian’s Elmer will be on display outside the Theatre Royal Plymouth.

For many of the artists, the trail has a real personal connection. Local artist Colin Pethick’s involvement was a chance to support St Luke’s and at the same time pay tribute to his wonderful wife Zheng, for whom the charity cared for before she passed away he said: “It was so inspiring to see all the Elmers together, truly mind boggling how so many fantastic ideas have formulated from one form, good old Elmer. To meet David was such an honour. I was moved greatly by the smaller Elmer’s also and the participation of the school children. It is so important to me as an artist that we inspire and encourage the young creative minds and also through that process educate on the notion of bereavement. That for me was why I was so pleased to be invited to take part in the project. It was such a valid form of cathartic release for me personally. Thank you again St Luke’s for everything.” You can see Colin’s Elmer titled “The Beauty of Transcience” displayed on Plymouth Hoe.

St Luke’s Chief Executive, Steve Statham, said: “The wait is over and it’s time for the grand reveal of Elmer’s Big Parade! We couldn’t be more excited to see everyone get out and about across our city’s iconic locations to follow the herd.

“The Parade is going to be a real delight for people of all ages as they explore on foot and interact with the social media side, too. Along the way, they’ll learn more about the outstanding care and support St Luke’s provides for patients at home, in hospital and at our specialist unit at Turnchapel.

“We believe everyone deserves to live well to the end, and it’s only thanks to the kindness of our community that we can sustain our service, being there to make a difference and helping families through the most challenging of times.

“The support of local businesses is a critical part of this, and the way they’ve got behind Elmer’s Big Parade as sponsors is heart-warming. There’s still time for more to be part of one of the city’s biggest events and get their brand in a prominent position seen by thousands – a great opportunity to raise their profile while doing good.

“To everyone who has put in the hours and gone the extra mile to make this fantastic summer extravaganza happen, I want to say a huge thank you. It would not have been possible without our hardworking staff and volunteers, as well as our sponsors and the companies who have given in kind. I feel very proud to be part of such an incredibly caring community.”

Bob Dennison, Managing Director of Stagecoach South West, the headline sponsor of the trail, said: “We are thrilled to be Presenting Partner and supporting such a wonderful charity. We will be working to help raise awareness of Elmer’s Big Parade Plymouth and the incredible work done by St Luke’s, and of course help raise vital funds. We work to support a range of local community causes in the South West, the very communities we help bring together through our local bus services. It’s fantastic to see the excitement about the trail already starting to build and we are delighted to be backing such a fabulous and worthwhile fundraising campaign.”

The grand finale of Elmer’s Big Parade will be the auction at which the Elmer sculptures will be going, going, gone to raise funds for St Luke’s.

The official trail map is available to download via the App Store, Google Play or available in print at local tourist information and St Luke’s charity shops.

For more information about the Parade and how you can get involved, visit: www.elmerplymouth.co.uk or follow the trail on social media @ElmerPlymouth #ElmerPlymouth.

The much-loved St Luke’s at home nurses opened the hospice’s new look Launceston furniture store on Monday 1 July.

The former St Luke’s outlet in the centre of Launceston closed back in February and the hard-working local charity has been looking for new premises ever since. The new shop on Hurdon Road, opposite the busy retail park with M&S Food, Costa Coffee and B&M, offers easy access, parking and a great deal for your money.

This will be the only second-hand furniture shop of this size in Launceston, offering great quality furniture, sofas and refurbished white goods. Also on offer are brand new mattresses, donated clothes, toys, and bric-a-brac at very reasonable prices.

Cash raised from running the store will go towards the over £7 million St Luke’s needs to raise to provide free-or-charge end of life care to families across the area. Around 16% of St Luke’s care last year was delivered to patients in East Cornwall, many at home.

St Luke’s shop manager Karen Millan said, “When you shop with us, you really do make a difference to local people. We’re proud to be back in Launceston at this great location, alongside our other Cornish charity shops in Callington and Saltash.”

Karen explains, “After having my children, I worked for the NHS as a maternity healthcare assistant, then a shop manager, training manager and area manager in charity retail. I also spent much of the last decade as full-time carer for my parents. Sadly, they are no longer here, but after St Luke’s worked with my Mum in her last few weeks I know they would be so pleased to know I am working for such an amazing organisation. I feel privileged and excited to head the brilliant Launceston team.”

St Luke’s Head of Retail, Mike Picken said, “It’s great to be back in this corner of Cornwall and we’re looking forward to welcoming customers old and new with this move to a more accessible location. We can’t do this without the support of the community though. Please consider us when you have household goods to donate – we offer a free-of-charge collection service and we’ll stretch every penny we raise to offer brilliant care to people in our local communities.” St Luke’s has over 30 charity shops across Plymouth, South East Cornwall and West Devon. Last year donations to St Luke’s charity shops generated over £1million of the £10 million cash needed to provide support to families at home or in the St Luke’s unit at Turnchapel. Sale items and other donations can be taken at any of the St Luke’s stores, please call ahead on 01752 964455 to organise large drop-offs or collections.