Biking bravehearts smash Compass Points Challenge

980 miles by bike in just ten days? They smashed it!

We’re in awe of the brave bunch who took on the epic challenge of covering England – north to south and east to west – on two wheels in aid of our charity, despite being relatively new to life in the saddle. Achieving all this in just ten days makes it all the more remarkable – that’s up to 11-and-half hours’ cycling a day for each of them!

Though the pandemic put paid to their plans to cycle to Barcelona last year, Dan Turner, Becky Smith, Tony Dinham, Jake Ryan, Max Hembroke and Jordey Logan could not be deterred from getting on their bikes for us and hatched a new plan. And – when the going got really tough – memories of their loved ones cared for by St Luke’s spurred them on, mile after gruelling mile.

As part of their route, which saw them cross the Meridian Line, go over (and under!) rivers and pass stone circles, they made a special stop-off at Turnchapel to meet some of our nurses who were there to cheer them on.

Dan said: “We’d never done anything like this before and there’s no denying the challenge felt brutal at times, but we were spurred on by memories friends and family cared for by St Luke’s, including my mum and my nan. We’re determined to give something back to the charity to say thank-you for such superb care. It’s the least we can do to support such a vital resource for our community.”

Huge thanks to all the cyclists, plus their support team Al Filbey and Chloe Dinham. We’re also really grateful to everyone who’s backed them with donations, taking them to a fantastic total of £7,115 – and counting!

If you’d like to add your donation, please click here.

Learn more about St Luke’s cycle challenges here.

A (ten) grand day for Elaine!

Friday 13 August turned out to be a very lucky date indeed for the winner of our weekly lottery rollover prize, Elaine from South East Cornwall. It wasn’t just a grand day – it was a ten-grand day, thanks to the news that she’d scooped £10,000!

To Elaine, who is disabled and lives with her much-loved dog Leah, her bumper win feels ‘life-changing’ after so many years spent struggling just to get by. She said: “When I got the call, it came as a huge shock but a very, very good one! It is more money than I have ever had all at one time and what it has given me is priceless. I now have peace of mind, knowing I can finally afford to replace my fridge and other old appliances – doing that, and keeping some for my future, means such a huge weight off my mind.

“I’ve taken part in St Luke’s lottery since 2014 because I know how needed their care is right across the community. I’ve won £10 before but nothing prepared me for this!”

Our lottery is played by people across Plymouth and surrounding areas where we give our compassionate care, and Elaine is one of almost 2,000 supporters who prefer to take part the traditional way, paying their fee in person rather than online. There to see her receive the bumper cheque from Trish Whitefoot of our Lottery Team was Yvette Walker, the long-serving, big-hearted Lottery Collector who’s got to know Elaine over the years she has been visiting to collect her participation fee.

Elaine said: “I look forward to Yvette’s visits and it means a lot that she always makes time for a catch-up. If, like me, you can’t get out much anymore because of age or disability, it makes a big difference seeing a friendly face you know and trust.”

Yvette, who is in her 60s, joined us almost ten years ago after living in London, where she was Area Fundraising Manager for the RNIB.  Struck by the positive difference a hospice in Harrow made to her mother when she needed day care support, she was keen to become part of the team at St Luke’s, recognising the importance of our lottery in raising vital funds to help our specialist service reach more local families.

Yvette, who – like all our Lottery Collectors – is self-employed, said: “This is so much more than just a job to me and I can’t imagine stopping. It’s needed because many of our lottery players – particularly those who are older – aren’t comfortable disclosing their bank details online and want to pay by cash. It also gives me a chance to ask how they are and catch up on their news. I’ll even nip to the shop if they’re not able to get out. I’m happy to help, knowing that for many I might be the only visitor they’ll have all week.

“I am thrilled Elaine is our rollover winner because I understand what a huge difference the prize will make to her. It just shows what is possible when you keep up your support for St Luke’s week on week!”

Get involved in our weekly lottery here.

Community unites for Midnight Walk in support of local hospice care

Midnight Walk turned Plymouth bright pink as a thousand women and girls came together wearing tee-shirts of that hue to walk across the city, raising vital funds to help ensure local people with terminal illness get high-calibre care that helps them live well to the end of their lives.

On Friday 20 August, saw much-loved local charity St Luke’s Hospice Plymouth welcome faces both familiar and new to its hotly anticipated mass participation fundraising event, Midnight Walk, following the sponsored walk’s cancellation last year because of the pandemic. So popular was the event in aid of the compassionate care the hospice provides across Plymouth and surrounding areas that it was a complete sell-out.

Setting off from Plymouth Argyle’s Home Park Stadium, the ladies followed 5, 10 or 15-mile route taking in many Plymouth landmarks, including Smeaton’s Tower and the Barbican. And when the challenge got tough, moral support came in abundance from the spectators who cheered them on from their front gardens and the passing motorists who tooted their horns in solidarity.

The event, sponsored by GA Solicitors, saw many participants walking in memory of lost loved ones, having fun and making new memories as they celebrated the lives of people special to them who will never be forgotten.

Among those taking on the full 15 miles were Caroline Mercer from Salcombe, her daughters Cerys and Tegan and friends Debbie, Emma and Alice. The group was walking in memory of Lyndsey (Lynds) Fisher-Khoury, Caroline’s best friend and godmother to Cerys and Tegan, who was looked after by St Luke’s at Turnchapel before sadly, she died in May 2019.

Caroline said: “Lynds was such a special person – she loved life and was so kind and caring. She was always beautifully dressed and shone in any room yet was so down to earth. She was a lovely godmother, too, and we all miss her so much.

St Luke's Midnight Walk Caroline Mercer

“When Lynds needed St Luke’s care at Turnchapel, they looked after her wonderfully in a beautiful room looking onto the gardens. It helped her husband Mark, and all of us, to see that she was comfortable and at ease in such a peaceful place where nothing was ever too much trouble. Whenever we visited Lynds, we were always made to feel so welcome by the staff and I will never forget their kindness at such heart-breaking time.”

Also walking 15 miles were sisters Tracey Brannan from Crownhill and Suzanne Clough from Brixton, walking in memory of their much-loved grandfather Peter Clough. St Luke’s cared for Peter at home and later at its specialist unit at Turnchapel.

Tracey said: “Doing Midnight Walk this year feels extra special because it’s coming up to ten years since granddad died and it’s our way of paying tribute to him. What stood out to me about St Luke’s was the way their care helped him not just physically but mentally, too. They gave him – and us as a family – the ultimate support throughout. It’s really important to us to show our gratitude because there’s an endless need for what the charity provides.”

St Luke's Midnight Walk Tracey and Suzanne

Suzanne said: “I would have been marrying my fiancé Ashley today, but we postponed because of the pandemic. So, it was wonderful to be in an atmosphere of celebration at Midnight Walk, remembering our amazing granddad and doing our bit for such a vital service for our community.”

Head of Fundraising at St Luke’s, Penny Hannah, said: “What an electric atmosphere! A huge, heartfelt thank you to all the ladies who came out to support St Luke’s – you are all incredible and we loved seeing you!

“From the dedications on the backs of all the tee-shirts it was clear to see the positive impact St Luke’s has had on so many local families in need at a time of crisis.

“After the disappointment of having to cancel last year’s Midnight Walk due to COVID-19 safety measures, this year’s event felt even more special. For some of the ladies taking part, it was the first opportunity they have had to reunite with family and friends since losing a loved one during the past 18 months, which have been so incredibly tough for people going through bereavement.

“We are so grateful to everyone who took part. Sponsorship money raised helps keep our team on the road 365 days a year, giving their compassionate care to patients in the comfort of their own home and supporting their families – all of which helps make our community a kinder place for people living and dying with terminal illness and for those close to them, too.

“I also want to thank all the other big-hearted people who make an event of this magnitude possible. That includes our army of amazing volunteers, our sponsors GA Solicitors, Plymouth Argyle, Cheezifit for the fantastic warm-up routine, Devon and Cornwall 4×4 Response Team, Devon and Cornwall Cycle Marshalls, PL1 Events and all the businesses and other organisations who’ve donated products and services. We simply couldn’t have done it without them and we are so grateful.”

 

Pride in Plymouth header

St Luke’s at Pride in Plymouth

Even the rain couldn’t dampen our enthusiasm – we were proudly part of last week’s Pride in Plymouth 2021 and it was great meeting so many who came along!
Our friendly team – including some of our nurses – were on hand ready to say hi, answer any questions  and let everyone know about the compassionate care our charity provides for local people with terminal illness, regardless of their background or circumstances.

It’s an event we always want to be part of because it’s a great opportunity to meet our city’s LGBTQ+ community and find out what matters most to them. Having honest conversations means our charity is better placed to ensure everyone in Plymouth and surrounding areas who is living with a life-limiting condition has access to the high-quality care they need, and deserve, at the end of their lives.

We know some LGBTQ+ people still experience discrimination when it comes to accessing healthcare, and that they are among the 1 in 4 people nationally who miss out on the high-quality care they need at the end of their lives. We’re doing our bit to tackle this inequality so that they feel understood and are looked after in the way that’s right them. We’re here to support those who love and care for them, too.
Ali in our team caring for patients at home said: “Death does not discriminate – neither do we. We’re committed to tackling unfairness and inequality in all its forms, making our community a kinder place for everyone affected by terminal illness.”

If you have any questions or need to talk to our team, don’t hesitate to drop us an e-mail on info@stlukes-hospice.org.uk.
St Luke's Midnight Walk Case Study Header. Images of the twins taking part in the Midnight Walk through the years.

St Luke's Midnight Walk Case Study Header. Images of the twins taking part in the Midnight Walk through the years.

Midnight Walk twin power!

When it comes to taking part in our much-loved Midnight Walk to raise vital funds for our charity, the more feet on the ground the better!

Not only are we excited to meet ladies participating in the challenge for the very first time, we love welcoming back the familiar faces once again stepping out to help us care for more people in their community. You can imagine, then, how delighted we are that twins Hazel Foster and Marcia Collins have registered to take part – not for their second, third or even fourth year, but their incredible 13th!

When the dynamic duo – who will celebrate their 60th birthdays just six days after this year’s event – heard that Midnight Walk is back on 20 August, they wasted no time in signing up.

The many thousands of steps taken by the twins in aid of St Luke’s are testament to the special place our charity holds in their hearts. Over the years, people close to them – including their beloved mother Joan Luckham, have been looked after by our team with such compassion that participating in Midnight Walk year on year is the sisters’ way of saying thank-you to us for going the extra mile.

Image of the sisters at a past Midnight Walk

Hazel, who lives in Woolwell, said: “Ever since we first took part in Midnight Walk in 2008, Marcia and I have been hooked! To us, there’s just no event like it so as soon as we’ve done one, we can’t wait to do another. The atmosphere is truly amazing – everybody is really friendly and we love the camaraderie, walking alongside hundreds of other ladies of all ages who are remembering their loved ones, too.

“When mum was in her last weeks of life, the care from St Luke’s was superb. Not only that, they supported us as a family. We felt listened to and understood. For Marcia and me, doing Midnight Walk is us giving something back for such kindness both then and more recently, with others dear to us also needing to be looked after by the hospice.

“Quite simply, I don’t know what families would do without St Luke’s in our city. It’s important we show our support so that the charity is here for years to come.”

Midnight Walk is on 20 August, starting and finishing at Plymouth Argyle’s Home Park Stadium. For more information and to register, click here.

Midnight Walk is kindly sponsored by GA Solicitors.

St Luke's nurse Ali

 

When her mother died unexpectedly Alison Griffiths was left heartbroken, her pain compounded by her mum not receiving the high level of care she deserved in her final days. It was a profound experience that planted in Ali, a highly experienced nurse, the passionate desire to one day work in palliative and end of life care, reducing patients’ pain, putting them at ease and helping to ensure that their death is dignified and peaceful.

Now, having joined St Luke’s as Advanced Palliative Care Specialist Practitioner (APCSP) four months ago, Ali is realising her dream in this peripatetic role, looking after patients at home.

To qualify for such a specialist position, Ali had to complete six months’ study of complex subject matter, which she juggled with all the responsibilities of being a full-time Senior Sister at our partner organisation University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, where she managed a team of 52 staff on an acute respiratory ward.  What Ali could not have foreseen, however, was that a global pandemic was on the way and that she would also be required to help quickly launch and run one of the COVID admission wards at the hospital and the step- down ward for patients recovered enough to be able to return home.

Ali said: “Being part of the emergency response was tough and exhausting but I was able to draw on all my years of nursing to help, including experience of working in war-torn countries such as Afghanistan, where managing stress and constantly reprioritising was key. I was part of the intensive care team caring for wounded patients at Camp Bastion, the military, multinational-run trauma hospital.”

Listening to Ali, it is clear she is relishing being part of our charity, in a busy but less frenetic environment than the one she came from, giving her unhurried time to get to know her patients so that she can tailor care to best suit their needs. As APCSP, Ali is there to provide holistic care, along with diagnostic and treatment expertise, focussing on maintaining the highest possible quality of life for the people she looks after. The post of Advanced Nurse Practitioner is relatively new to St Luke’s and is ground-breaking, incorporating a deeper knowledge of anatomy and physiology as well as being a non-medical prescriber. These skills enable Ali to get to the very core of the patients’ symptoms, assess what is going on and then implement the best possible solutions and treatment options.

 

St Luke's community nurses outside of a home

Ali said: “When I arrive on their doorstep and they see the St Luke’s uniform, the relief patients feel is often palpable because they know they’re in good hands.

“Spending time with them in their own domain helps me build that deeper level of understanding of them, not just because of what they tell me but because all around are clues as to who they are as a person, from family photos to mementoes and books. It all helps me get to know them so I can develop their bespoke treatment plan. It’s a privilege to make a difference to them at such an anxious time – I find it incredibly rewarding.”

Ali is already feeling the benefit of having a better balance between work and home life, too. She said: “My wife is a Matron at the hospital so spinning lots of plates, just as I did when I was there. Life is busy at the hospice but there’s time to reflect, too, which is so important when you’re involved in such sensitive situations. Now, I have time to breathe and a renewed sense of energy and purpose, too.”

Along with her wealth of clinical expertise, passion and energy, Ali also brings to our charity experience of helping organisations to be truly inclusive in their approach so that no-one feels discriminated against. At UHP NHS Trust, she was part of the team that pioneered the implementation of the NHS rainbow badge for staff, a symbol letting patients know they can open up about issues related to sex and gender without fear of being judged or stigmatised.

Ali said: “It’s so important for health and social care organisations everywhere to not just talk the talk but walk the walk when it comes to being inclusive, otherwise people will continue to miss out on getting the treatment that’s right for them. They need to know that they can speak to us openly and that we are their allies.”

Talking of allies, Ali credits the huge kindness that surrounds her at St Luke’s with helping her manage the steep learning curve that comes with taking on a senior role in an unfamiliar organisation.

Beaming, she said: “I can only describe arriving here as like walking into a hug – everyone is so welcoming, friendly and helpful. It’s a really nurturing environment, too, where people are encouraged and supported to give their best – just like ingredients that make up a delicious cake! Joining St Luke’s has been life-changing in the very best way.”